NIGHT SWEATS & MENOPAUSE

NIGHT SWEATS & MENOPAUSE

We cannot cure Night Sweats or eradicate the effects of the onset of Menopause, but we can deal with some of the symptoms and give you a much better chance at getting a good night’s sleep.

Except on the coldest nights, we all welcome the feel of cool sheets as we enter the bed. This conductive transfer of temperature (in this case cooling) helps us to get comfortable. As we enter the bed, and even before the onset of night sweats or hot flushes, our bodies will be radiating and transferring our higher body heat into the sheets and over time, the mattress. Once the bed has reached the same temperature as your body, there are no means left to cool your body and it will keep radiating heat within the bed.

In order for your body to get into a good sleep pattern it needs to start losing heat. In general the body temperature only needs to drop 2 degrees fahrenheit during the night. This drop in temperature is essential for the body and mind to rest. We all know how we feel when it does not.

The body keeps generating a temperature of around 98.5 fahrenheit as long as we are awake, and the bed will stay heated and in fact get hotter. During tests we have seen bed temperatures of more than 104 fahrenheit. A bed which is now preheated by your body (and with no escape path for the increase in temperature) leaves the perfect environment for those who are prone to night sweats or hot flushes to start feeling very uncomfortable.

The Ezeenites Nite Fan deals with all these issues and makes it possible to deal with the worst of environments and episodes of discomfort. Firstly by allowing the fan to push air into the space where you are sleeping, it will carry some of the radiated heat out from under the covers. This will leave the sheets feeling cooler and prevent the mattress from acting as a heat store. Lastly, even a minor build up of sweat on your skin will feel the cooling effect of the moving air across your body. This will have a double effect of cooling you quickly and possibly turning off the trigger that caused you to sweat in the first place.